Flipped / Blended Classroom with NEO LMS

NEOLMS

As the new school year started last week I wanted to push further with my Flipped Classroom approach. My hacked-together system of EdPuzzle videos, Google Form WSQs and Google Classroom feedback to the students worked but was very time-consuming for the teacher. There was also a drawback to the students as it was difficult for them to quickly return to a topic at a later date for review.

I am currently half-way through completion of a University of Georgia Coursera entitled “K12 Blended and Online Learning”. I wanted to complete this to further my own knowledge and experience in this field and hoped that it would open my eyes to some pedagogical or behavioural methods for use in this type of learning environment.

I am enjoying using the Coursera system but it doesn’t let individual teachers create their own courses. When I worked at Robert Gordon’s College I successfully developed a number of iTunesU courses for iPad but unfortunately couldn’t leverage the same system for Macbook. I did a little research and found NEO LMS. It’s early days but I wanted to give my initial impressions of the service.

Courses were easy to create and customise and students register for these with an access code. When I introduced it in class last week there were NO issues with sign up – that rarely happens with new services. Students were impressed by the interface and found it easy to navigate.

I spent some more time exploring the multitude of options this afternoon while setting up two new courses. NEO LMS has made it so easy that I’m going to attempt to Flip my entire curriculum, not just a course or two throughout the year. I’ve already worked out how to get my students into separate Groups which then makes it easy to register them for future courses without the need for an access code. In fact, if you have the Enterprise edition, you can leverage the Rules engine to automatically enroll students in the next course when they finish the current one!

If you are looking into building your own Flipped / Blended courses then I highly recommend you check out NEO LMS. The individual teacher account is free and supports up to 200 students. You also get a 14-day trial of the Enterprise edition when you sign up.

This was originally posted on LinkedIn, 11th September 2016

Using CodeBug tethered via USB on a MacBook

It has been a few weeks since our CodeBugs arrived here in Milan and after playing around with some of the sample programs and thinking about their features I have decided to use these with next session’s Year 10 students as an introduction to the iGCSE Computer Science course in September.

While they worked really well with the Raspberry Pi I struggled to get the CodeBugs working with IDLE on the MacBook. Installing packages via Terminal updated the Python 2.7 install that comes with the OS and – for me anyway – Homebrew complicated what should have been a very easy process. In Visual Studio if you wanted to use a module library you simply added it to the project and IDLE does not have this function.

I found PyCharm today – an IDE for Python that allows me to add the codebug_tether module (and any others I need) with the minimum of fuss. Now my CodeBug can be programmed while connected via USB to my MacBook! As an added bonus I learned more about Virtual Environments.

IMAG1237

To make it easier for my students to get going with their CodeBugs in September I created a 20-step guide linked here. It’s CC0 so please feel free to use and adapt as required. If you find any mistakes or it just doesn’t work for you in the same way please let me know.

TeachMeet Aberdeen 2011 reflections (part 1/2)

One week on from TeachMeet Aberdeen I wanted to jot down my impressions of the evening, record links and any available presentations, and pass on contact details of the presenters.

I was made aware of TeachMeet Aberdeen 10 (SE) at the last minute and unfortunately could not attend but in the 12 months since I’ve been able to log into live webcasts of a number of TeachMeets around the UK. I’ve been inspired by the presenters and the organisers of these events and made use of their tips in my day-to-day lesson planning – improving the experience for pupils in my classroom. So when Stuart Brown asked if I’d like to help to arrange TeachMeet Aberdeen 11 I jumped at the chance.

Our decision making and delegation centred around email and twitter communication channels and was very successful. If anyone tells you that you need to look a co-organiser in the eye to effectively plan an event, tell them they’re living in the dark ages. Stuart was an excellent colleague, coordinating press coverage and the finer details of venue arrangements (the MacRobert building at University of Aberdeen: home of the Education faculty) without breaking sweat. We met in person for the first time at about 5pm on the day of the TeachMeet, which I think is fairly mind blowing as by that point pretty much everything was in place (including Stuart’s radio interview for the next day!).

Thanks too to Jim McCracken and Linda Stephen from University of Aberdeen who organised the wifi logins, tea and coffee, room booking and even a bit of cleaning! They were brilliant hosts and incredibly supportive and enthusiastic. Disaster seemed likely half way through the evening when the laptop ran out of charge due to fact it was streaming video onto the Internet. Without Linda sourcing a few power adapters in under five minutes we would have lost more than half of our audience! Jim even pitched in with a presentation on a resource recommended by one of his students. Saying “thanks” doesn’t seem to be enough.

The video of the evening is currently available in hour long chunks at http://www.livestream.com/teachmeetaberdeen11 but I am in the process of editing them into their individual presentations. It’s unfortunate that the Livestream studio is slightly blocked within the Aberdeenshire authority at the moment – something for future TeachMeet organisers to check out before using their service.

Martin Coutts (@mcoutts81) kicked off proceedings with a presentation on how he uses an iPad to engage secondary pupils in his mathematics classes. He even used his iPad to give the presentation and showed how this device could be a godsend to classroom teachers. Earlier in the evening Martin also demonstrated how his iPad 1 could record video by using separately purchased camera connection kit – it actually allows the user to capture in a better resolution than the iPad 2! Martin also showed the audience how he uses http://www.mangahigh.com and games-based learning to augment his learning and teaching to inspire his students. A great start!

[youtube http://youtu.be/vTyclpbbaFE]

Kirsty Marsland (@kirstymarsbar), currently studying for her PGDE in Modern Studies, gave an insight into how she uses Wordle to highlight learning intentions and generate interest in her lessons.

[youtube http://youtu.be/B4cGeRZf9Gw]

Stuart Brown (@stuart_g_brown) was up next and described some of the challenges he faces in using ICT effectively in the classroom. He also offered excellent probationary advice to the students in the audience (real and virtual) and mused on the impact his support philosoraptor had on the attainment of his pupils and why he would let pupils use mobile phones for learning in class. This was an excellent, well considered presentation that only got better with second viewing. Highly recommended!

[youtube http://youtu.be/QbbkYyQ5jpg]

Charlie Barrow (@charliebarrow) rounded off the first half by showing how he uses augmented reality at Portlethen Primary to make learning magical. He uses the mobile phone application Junaio and a lot of preparation to turn pupil-generated paper images into content activators which when scanned plays an associated video or takes the user to a particular web page. It looked amazing and although my set of iPods do not have cameras (which is unfortunately de rigour for augmented reality) I hope to speak to him further about his project and see if a link to secondary could be made.

[youtube http://youtu.be/DpOLNS729hc]

I’ll add the second post once all the videos have been uploaded to YouTube and my notes turned into something resembling a coherent train of thought!